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The anatomy lesson of Dr Nicolaes TulpIt is becoming more and more difficult to see what is real and what is not. The last decade or so we have seen the rise of augmented reality, adding information to the reality we see, for instance using a smart phone.We have seen virtual-reality becoming more mainstream, a complete virtual world in which people can immerse themselves and perhaps even live an alternate live. And we have even seen mixed reality where we find all of them mixed together. We can create a supermodel on a computer that is starting to look indistinguishable from a human being. All these technologies take a piece of reality and add something with the data except for the supermodel that is completely virtual. Do you use all the dimensions of your business data? How can you manage your data and how are other companies doing this? Read on and I will tell you!

Virtual-reality 

I saw a very nice example on LinkedIn a couple of days ago. It is the virtual-reality / augmented reality of the “Anatomy lessons by Nicolaes Tulp”, a famous painting by Rembrandt. Tulp practiced in the Theatrum Anatomicum in ‘De Waag’ building in Amsterdam. A Dutch company called th3rd, basically re-created the painting which is of course in 2D and scanned all the individual people (using 600 cameras) allowing you to walk through that painting and be among the people in the painting. Try it out yourself, there is an app for iOS as well as Android. You can see the video about the Rembrandy Reality AR portal app here. The project is a cooperation between Dutch insurance company Nationale Nederlanden and the Mauritshuis, a museum in The Hague.

 

Dimensions matter

The result is a new view on an existing painting literally adding a dimension to it. A nice experiment to see if technology can add that dimension. For me dimensions matters as well but in a slightly different way. Let me give you an example: Take something that is ‘flat’ about to do something you do. Flat in this case means one or two dimensional, let’s say a single number. Let's say that you sell 100 widgets every day. The total will be a hundred more or less every day. When you add the time dimension and look at the detailed data you find that on some days sell more in the morning. On other days, you sell more in the afternoon. What is the underlying cause and how can we either change that or use it? You might say: who cares, a hundred widgets it is a hundred widgets. I don't care when they are sold, in the morning, in the afternoon or in the evening, as long as they are sold. You are right, the fact that they are sold is important. But now the dimension comes into play. Perhaps you can either increase the sales effort in the morning when sales are slow to have even higher sales or for instance reduce the sales headcount you know is not going to be busy (from historical data and analyzing current data). That sort of detailed information comes from all kinds of systems in your organization. Whether it's a barcode scanner that people use, either in the warehouse or the point-of-sale, or from IOT devices that registers the number of clients entering your (online) shop. Capturing that data and looking at the data with a fresh view can be immensely rewarding.

Looking and managing

But how can you manage such data? I would suggest you look at the WSO2 stack that allows you to look at data streams whether they are from IOT devices or from processes running on your IT platform. Capturing the data, analyzing the data and subsequently use a dashboard to turn the data meaningful information that you can use to optimize your company. WSO2’ stack consists of a number of enterprise grade solutions that can help you look differently at your data and processes, very much like the Rembrandt Reality App allows a new look on a famous painting. Have a look at our selection guide about ESB and learn more!

ESB Selection Guide 

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Published March 19, 2019

Ruben van der Zwan

Ruben is CEO and founder of Yenlo. He is an IT visionary from the first hour, and always working on creating better ICT solutions. Ruben believes that with technology, we can bring the people in this world together and bring prosperity to everyone. Ruben is an evangelist of open source technology, integration platforms, and WSO2 in particular. He is a frequent speaker on international conferences.

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